The Quake is good business

After one week in Norwegian cinemas, The Quake is shaking up some real business and on its way to become a success, just like its predecessor, The Wave. The opening weekend alone was the strongest in 2018 for any movie. In its first weekend more than 155.000 Norwegian film fans went to see Oslo shaken…

The Quake preview

Roar Uthaug was an established director in Norway when he flooded Norwegian cinemas with The Wave in 2015. Now the sequel is here, in which director John Andreas Andersen takes the disaster to Oslo. The Wave was Norway’s first proper disaster film and pulled a huge crowd to cinemas, with more than 800.000 tickets sold.…

Review: Kurt Josef Wagle

Low budget film making is sometimes a creative field, but for some it is a necessity and it doesn’t always hit the target. This movie, from the creators of Dead Snow and Kill Buljo, was probably more fun to make than it is to watch. Following the story structure of Blair Witch Project, Kurt Josef Wagle og…

Review: The Wave

We have had surges of slashers, floods of mythology movies and torrents of indie horrors. Now the scene is set for The wave, but will it drown in competition with Hollywood? Touted as being the first disaster movie to come out of Scandinavia, Roar Uthaug’s The wave splashed its way through Norwegian cinemas with great success…

The Wave preview

Director Roar Uthaug continues to explore new film territory with his new action blockbuster, The wave. The only drawback is that his movie is only time away from being gruesome reality. It was not until Dark Woods in 2003 that Norway got it’s first bonafide horror movie. In 2010 The Troll Hunter got the honour…

Dark Woods relaunched

In a rare move, Norway’s first real horror film, Dark Woods, is being relaunched on all relevant formats, to warm up for the sequel that is coming later this year. It says something about a country that their first mainstream horror movie came out as late as in 2003. Dark Woods (original title; Villmark) was…

Review: Dark Woods

In a good year, we make perhaps 20 movies here in Norway. Only a few years ago, 10 movies annually was the norm. Most films are made with government support which means that all projects are subject to approval, and up until recently genre films almost never got enough backing to get off the ground.…